They are 42 different types of pumpkins. The more common ones are acorn squashes and pumpkins available at your local grocer. They are delicious year-round but during fall they are at their peak including their marvelous nutritional and health benefits. You can bake them into pies, side dishes, or carve them for Halloween.

Pumpkins and acorn squashes are rich in potassium and can have a positive effect on blood pressure. The antioxidants in these fall vegetables could help prevent degenerative damage to the eyes. They have a range of fantastic health benefits, including being one of the best-known sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a powerful antioxidant. It also gives orange vegetables and fruits their vibrant color. The body converts any ingested beta-carotene into vitamin A.

Consuming foods rich in beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer, offer protection against asthma and heart disease, and delay aging and body degeneration.

Many studies have suggested that eating more plant foods such as pumpkin and acorn squash decreases the risk of obesity and overall mortality. It can also help prevent diabetes and heart disease, and promote a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy, and a healthy body mass index (BMI).

Acorn squashes and pumpkins are both powerful sources of fiber. Research has suggested a positive relationship between a diet rich in beta-carotene and a reduced risk of prostate cancer.

Ingredients:

1 large pumpkin

1 acorn squash

Cinnamon, to taste

Nutmeg, to taste

Cloves, to taste

Allspice, to taste

2 tbsp. brown sugar

Dried cranberries (optional)

Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

Cut up pumpkin and acorn squash and toss with olive oil.

Place in a 9 by 13-inch pan. Sprinkle the desired amount of cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, allspice, and two tablespoons of brown sugar over the acorn squash and pumpkin. Sprinkle with dried cranberries if desired.

In a preheated oven of 425°F, bake for approximately 30 to 40 minutes.

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